Audrey E. Kitagawa, J.D.

President and Founder

"In the seemingly ordinariness of daily living is the power of transformation. Individual transformation arises out of awareness, and a willingness to change to become a better person right where we are. We each have personal responsibility and collective responsibility to make positive changes here and now."

Background

Mutombo Nkulu-N’Sengha is an Assistant Professor at California State University Northridge since Fall 2003. He is a poet, a teacher, and a human rights activist. He is also a member of the Global Dialogue Institute, and a member of the Center for Global Ethics. This year, he created at CSUN the Global Village Forum.

Before coming to CSUN, he taught at Haverford College (Philadelphia), Temple University (Philadelphia), and Montclair State University (New Jersey) courses as diverse as Asian Religions; World Religions; Western intellectual heritage;† Philosophical Thinking: An Introduction to Western Philosophy; Interreligious Dialogue; Racial Justice; Basics of Catholic Faith; Christian Ethics; Introduction to the Bible; African Religions; African Philosophy; African Politics; African Civilization, Africa in the 20th Century; Black Church in America; Religions of American Minorities; Death and Dying.

Before coming to the United States for his graduate studies, Mutombo Nkulu-N Sengha, who has traveled in all the four major continents, studied philosophy, literature, and world history in Africa, and in Rome, where he also worked as a broadcaster at the Vatican Radio. Over the last 10 years, he has done research in France, England, Spain, Germany, and Switzerland. In 1997, he represented Temple University in Jakarta (Indonesia) at the International Conference on Dialogue among Muslims, Jews, and Christians. In January (2005) he presented at a conference at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) on the impact of African religions in the Americas and in Europe.

After a Masters in Philosophy (in Africa) and a Masters in Theology (magna cum laude, Rome), he pursued graduate studies in the United States where he prepared a Doctorate in Religion and Human Rights at Temple University (Philadelphia) and a Masters in African American Studies. Mutombo has also a certificate in Political Sciences from Rome and a Certificate in Oriental studies (Coptic studies and the language and religion of Pharaonic Egypt).

A good researcher, Mutombo Nkulu-N’Sengha is also a good teacher. In 1997, he was awarded a certificate of merit for excellent teaching by Temple University (Philadelphia). His work is focused on human rights, and on the dialogue between civilizations, especially in the field of religion and philosophy. Some of his writings are being used in the classrooms of some American universities.

He is presently working on a comparative study between African and Korean traditional religions. Mutombo has published extensively in Italian, French, and English. His recent work includes two articles on African philosophy and African epistemology or ways of knowing published this year in California in the “Encyclopedia of Black Studies” (Sage, 2005). He is presently working on two projects: on just war theory and the African response to war on terror (to be published in London); and African religion and violence against women. He is also working on two books: one on  African theology of human rights, and the other on African contributions to world religions and world peace.

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Background

Audrey E. Kitagawa, JD, is the President/Founder of the International Academy for Multicultural Cooperation, the President of the Light of Awareness International Spiritual Family, the former Advisor to the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Children and Armed Conflict at the United Nations.

She is a United Nations Representative for the United Religions Initiative, and Chair Emerita of the NGO Committee on Spirituality, Values and Global Concerns, A Committee of the Conference of NGOs in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations. She has been enstooled into the royal family as the Nekoso Hemaa, (i.e. Queen Mother of Development), of Ajiyamanti in Ghana, West Africa, and has a school which she helped to build named after her in her African name, the Nana Ode Anyankobea Junior Secondary School.

She wrote the chapter, Crossing World Views, The Power of Perspective in the Hawaii Japanese American Experience, which was published in a book about multiculturalism, communication and Asian women entitled, Learning In The Light. Her chapter, Globalization As The Fuel For Religious And Ethnic Conflict has been published in the book, Globalization And Identity, Cultural Diversity, Religion and Citizenship. Her article, The Role Of Identity In The Rise And Decline of Buddhism In Hawaii, The 50th State Of The United States Of America, has been published in Sambodhi, a Buddhist Journal. She published articles in World Affairs The Journal Of International Issues, entitled, The Power of Om: Transformation of Consciousness, and Practical Spirituality. She wrote the chapter, The US In Foreign Affairs: Source of Global Security, Or Source of Global Fear? in the book, America & The World The Double Bind. She is currently writing a chapter on Space Ethics for a legal, academic book on Space Law.

She has been listed in Who's Who Of American Law, Who's Who Of American Women, Who's Who In America, Who's Who In The World, and Prominent People of Hawaii. She is the recipient of the Medal “Pride of Eurasia” and a Diploma from the Republic of Kazakhstan Ministry of Education and Science L.N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University for her outstanding contribution to the development of spiritual culture and education in Eurasia. She is the recipient of the Spirit of the UN Award which is given to outstanding individuals who have demonstrated the vision and spirit of the United Nations as expressed through the UN Charter, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. She was conferred an Honorary Interfaith Minister degree by the New Seminary.

Mutombo Nkulu-N'Sengha, Ph.D.

Professor at California State University, Northridge

“We think peace cannot be promoted unless we tackle the root causes of violence and this involves teaching human rights.”

Biography

Mutombo Nkulu-N’Sengha is an Assistant Professor at California State University Northridge since Fall 2003. He is a poet, a teacher, and a human rights activist. He is also a member of the Global Dialogue Institute, and a member of the Center for Global Ethics. This year, he created at CSUN the Global Village Forum.

Before coming to CSUN, he taught at Haverford College (Philadelphia), Temple University (Philadelphia), and Montclair State University (New Jersey) courses as diverse as Asian Religions; World Religions; Western intellectual heritage;† Philosophical Thinking: An Introduction to Western Philosophy; Interreligious Dialogue; Racial Justice; Basics of Catholic Faith; Christian Ethics; Introduction to the Bible; African Religions; African Philosophy; African Politics; African Civilization, Africa in the 20th Century; Black Church in America; Religions of American Minorities; Death and Dying.

Before coming to the United States for his graduate studies, Mutombo Nkulu-N Sengha, who has traveled in all the four major continents, studied philosophy, literature, and world history in Africa, and in Rome, where he also worked as a broadcaster at the Vatican Radio. Over the last 10 years, he has done research in France, England, Spain, Germany, and Switzerland. In 1997, he represented Temple University in Jakarta (Indonesia) at the International Conference on Dialogue among Muslims, Jews, and Christians. In January (2005) he presented at a conference at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) on the impact of African religions in the Americas and in Europe.

After a Masters in Philosophy (in Africa) and a Masters in Theology (magna cum laude, Rome), he pursued graduate studies in the United States where he prepared a Doctorate in Religion and Human Rights at Temple University (Philadelphia) and a Masters in African American Studies. Mutombo has also a certificate in Political Sciences from Rome and a Certificate in Oriental studies (Coptic studies and the language and religion of Pharaonic Egypt).

A good researcher, Mutombo Nkulu-N’Sengha is also a good teacher. In 1997, he was awarded a certificate of merit for excellent teaching by Temple University (Philadelphia). His work is focused on human rights, and on the dialogue between civilizations, especially in the field of religion and philosophy. Some of his writings are being used in the classrooms of some American universities.

He is presently working on a comparative study between African and Korean traditional religions. Mutombo has published extensively in Italian, French, and English. His recent work includes two articles on African philosophy and African epistemology or ways of knowing published this year in California in the “Encyclopedia of Black Studies” (Sage, 2005). He is presently working on two projects: on just war theory and the African response to war on terror (to be published in London); and African religion and violence against women. He is also working on two books: one on  African theology of human rights, and the other on African contributions to world religions and world peace.

Organization

Institution

Content

December 12, 2020

LUBA Art San Francisco

November 11, 2013

Our Sacred Journey: Hope Against Hope in the Congo

July 1, 2013

Our Sacred Journey: Love of Life

September 11, 2012

A Journey to the Democratic Republic of Congo

September 10, 2012

Democratic Republic of Congo

May 21, 2012

Our Sacred Journey: Bumuntu Spirituality and Global Solidarity in a Burning House

January 1, 2011

Bumuntu Memory and Authentic Personhood: An African Art of Becoming Humane

April 29, 2008

California State University Northridge (2008)

The African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights:  An African Contribution to the Project of a Global Ethic

Our Land in Kamina - Congo Project - Bumuntu Peace Institute

Mutombo Nkulu-N'Sengha, Ph.D. Publications

War, Environmental Crisis, and "Mining Terrorism" in the Congo Prolegomenon for an African Philosophy of Sustainability

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